The Stoics are known for their control of their emotions and for their pursuit of wisdom, truth and perseverance. After 2,000 years, the philosophy of Seneca, Marcus Aurelius and Epictetus still hold true. This is because Stoicism is practical in nature. While I find the history and inner workings of philosophy interesting, most do not. Stoicism is popular for a number of reasons. It is practical and not just conceptual.

 

The writings of the ancient philosophers focus on real-world tips and tools to apply Stoicism in your daily life. This is why people, like Tim Ferris, choose to use philosophy as a personal operating system. Technologists should use this 2,000 year old method to identify what matters and focus solely on those things. Here are four things Stoicism can teach us.

 

1. Your product must serve a real, identifiable problem.

 

A product must serve a problem that a customer has and is willing to pay for a solution. The problem must be real enough to cause customers to change. Seneca talks about life being similar to a play but the importance is “not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters.”

 

The same goes for everything about your product, operations and business. The excellence of delivery is the only thing that matters. And it all starts with one thing - a problem worth solving.

 

The first step is to have a real problem to solve. But that isn’t the only thing that matters. You must have a clear reason why you are solving this problem. The cliche and often overused words by Seneca apply here: if one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable.

 

The “why” not only drives your development process, go-to-market strategy and tactics but it influences team dynamics and hiring decisions. It has been written before, but you must know your why.

 

2. Focus on your minimally viable segment.

 

If you ask technology strategists how to launch a product they will come back with a number of buzzwords and phrases. Start lean. Be agile. Build an MVP. Launch a beta. Sure, this is fine advice. But often an important piece is missing.


“To be everywhere is to be nowhere.” Seneca wrote this words to help his students uncover the importance of mindfulness and focus. This applies even more so when selecting a first group of customers to tackle. The technologist should think in this way. To try to serve every one is to try to serve no one.


Identify your first core group of users and solve their problem first. They will be your early adopters and referrers and provide early feedback on how to grow your product.

 

3. Data and customers are your true north.

 

Marcus Aurelius wrote a daily meditation while running his military campaigns. He journaled frequently on topics of perseverance and wisdom.

 

“If someone is able to show me that what I think or do is not right, I will happily change, for I seek the truth, by which no one was ever truly harmed. It is the person who continues in his self-deception and ignorance who is harmed.” – Marcus Aurelius

 

Marcus Aurelius sought truth, the best technologists can find is data. You cannot ignore data as a technologist. All aspects of data are important but some are more important than others. Usability labs, traffic, customer behavior, feedback forms and digital metrics are just the beginning. When you encounter information on how your customers behave and what they want, you must adapt your strategy and tactics.

 

4. Anyone on your team can add value to your product.

 

Every team has a leader and every company a CEO. But, team members at every level could provide value to your product. Data scientists, software engineers, UX architects and product managers all have their relative expertise. Do not discount the potential for an intern or your CFO to provide excellent input and insight on features to build next.

 

Seneca the Younger in his Letters to a Stoic echoed this sentiment in his writings “I shall never be ashamed of citing a bad author if the line is good.” He was referencing ethics, reason, and good and evil, but the concept applies to product management. CFOs and interns can have great UX ideas.